2017 Games for Change Festival dates and location announced

The 2017 Games for Change Festival will be July 31 to August 2 in New York City.

It’s a new year and a new Festival!

Our annual Games for Change Festival returns to The New School’s Parsons School of Design in New York City for its 14th edition on July 31 to August 2.

Based on overwhelming feedback, we’re bringing back the three tracks we introduced last year:

  • Games for Learning Summit
  • Neurogaming & Health
  • Civics & Social Issues

And don’t miss our networking opportunities, Awards Ceremony, and the G4C Marketplace, where you can showcase your new games and products to Festival attendees. We have a few new surprises in store, too.

Keep an eye out for the call to submit your talk ideas and games to our Festival within the next month. In the meantime, check out the recap of our 2016 Festival and videos of past talks on our YouTube channel.

For partnership opportunities, please contact Cindy Goldberg at cindy@gamesforchange.org.

Make sure you’re signed up for our newsletter to get the latest updates on the 2017 Festival.


Posted in G4C Announcement, G4C Festival | Tagged | 1 Comment

Games for Change Migration Challenge: A $10,000 game design competition on migration

G4C Migration Design Challenge

Send your game ideas about migration integration for our $10,000 challenge!

The integration of migrant populations has always been an important issue faced by many countries all around the world. Integration is a two-way street, with native-born and immigrant populations both experiencing significant change, challenges and opportunity. How can a game help people understand and work through concerns over perceived job competition and changes in the cultural fabric while recognizing the economic, linguistic, and cultural benefits that can accrue to the broader society when immigrants can also succeed? How can a game experience emphasize community engagement to help migrants and their neighbors improve their understanding of each other?

This is where you come in. In partnership with the Migration Policy Institute, Games for Change is hosting a $10,000 migrant game design challenge that hopes to inspire the creation of a game that connects existing and migrating communities. We want to address the importance of how integration is a two-way street, with both communities experiencing drastic new conflicts and opportunities that are unique to cultural integration.

The challenge is open to entrants from all around the world and requires no previous development experience to submit game design ideas that will engage the players to think about the long term effects and issues of migrant integration in their own lives and communities.
 

Submit your game idea!

Key Dates:

  • January 10: Submissions open
  • February 15: Deadline for submissions
  • March 15: Winner selected

Prizes:

One selected winner will receive $10,000.

Guidelines:

Read the official rules and guidelines for a complete background, competition guidelines, and criteria.

Resources from the Migration Policy Institute:

Posted in Design Challenge | 27 Comments

In NYC? Come to our next Talk and Play event for a panel, arcade, and book launch

Talk and Play Series: Power Play book event banner
 
Games for Change is pleased to invite you to a special panel of pioneering game makers with a hall-of-fame video game arcade, all part of an early launch of the book Power Play: How Video Games Can Save the World.

The event is co-hosted with Playcrafting, as part of their Winter Expo featuring the work of more than 200 independent developers. Registering for this panel gives you FREE access to the Winter Expo.

Panelists:

  • Asi Burak, co-author of Power Play
  • Susanna Pollack, G4C president
  • Amy Sterling, executive director of EyeWire
  • Navid Khonsari, creator of 1979 Revolution

 
Authors Asi Burak (G4C chairman) and Laura Parker (co-author and journalist) will sign copies of Power Play after the panel! If you can’t join the event, you can pre-order the book here.
 

Register Here

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Games for Change is looking for social media, communications, festival, and operations interns!

We’re looking for interns who are interested in getting involved with games for social impact.

By working with us, you’ll gain an in-depth understanding of the video games industry (especially games for change!) and get a behind-the-scenes look of a nonprofit. Our interns are active participants in team meetings and work closely with our staff.

Interns will support the following programs:

  • Games for Change Festival: Our annual 800-attendee event in New York City that celebrates the positive impact of games.
  • G4C Student Challenge: We’ve launched our second Games for Change Student Challenge, a new game design program for middle and high school students, in New York City, Dallas, and Pittsburgh.
  • G4C Industry Circle: Our program that acknowledges the achievements and opportunities in the games for change sector by highlighting leading studios that have made a significant contribution to our community.

Internships are for school credit only, and applicants must be attending school or recently graduated. See below for more details on each internship and how to apply. We look forward to hearing from you!

We are accepting applications for the following positions:

 


SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING INTERN

The Social Media Marketing Intern will support Games for Change’s social media channels on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn to promote the work of G4C and its community far and wide! This is a collaborative role that involves working closely with the G4C team.

Start date: January 16
Location: New York City or remote
Duration: Minimum 12 weeks, 20-24 hours per week

Responsibilities:

  • Draft social media content for Games for Change’s social media accounts on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn
  • Help manage our social media and communications calendar for multiple G4C programs including the annual G4C Festival and National Student Challenge
  • Schedule approved posts via Tweetdeck, social media scheduling tools
  • Research leaders and influencers in key areas for G4C programs
  • Provide monthly reports from Google Analytics and social media tools
  • Research industry news and updates from game developers
  • Add posts to the Games for Change blog

Key Qualifications:

  • You have excellent grammar, writing, and research skills
  • Ideally, you have experience running or creating content for social media accounts for an organization, company, blog/media or brand.
  • You have active accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and are familiar with scheduling tools such as Tweetdeck or Hootsuite.
  • Know how to collect and report social media metrics
  • Basic photo-editing skills for editing photos and screenshots
  • Knowledge of Excel, Word, Google Docs
  • Comfortable with WordPress and HTML
  • Driven to complete tasks on time and able to switch gears quickly
  • Ideally knowledge of and/or interest in video games

Requirements:

  • Weekly commitment of minimum 20 hours/week; minimum of 12 weeks.
  • Internship is for school credit only. Applicants must be enrolled in a college or university level program and eligible to receive school credit

How to apply:
To apply, please send an email with the subject line “G4C Social Media Intern” to Meghan Ventura at meghan (at) gamesforchange.org. Please send your resume as an attachment and include the following information in the body of the email:

  • Availability (hours per week) and location
  • School, program and expected graduation year
  • 3 sample tweets about the G4C Festival written as if from the @G4C Twitter account.
  • Your favorite game and an overview of your interest in and experience with games (design, play, etc.)
  • Details on any prior related internship experience

 


FESTIVAL PRODUCTION INTERN

Games for Change is seeking a Festival Production Intern to support our  NYC team on a range of production needs for the 2017 Games for Change Festival.

The ideal candidate will be an enthusiastic and driven production assistant, with experience in event planning and production. This is a collaborative role that involves working closely with the G4C team.

Start date: January 16
Location: New York City
Duration: Minimum 12 weeks, 16-24 hours per week

Responsibilities:

  • Support G4C Festival production team (Executive Producer and Producer) in daily activities across a range of festival development and production projects
  • Conduct research on partnerships, sponsorships, venues, vendors, and technology
  • Communicate and manage outreach to partners, speakers, and sponsors
  • Coordinate travel plans, volunteer outreach, and website content

 Qualifications:

  • Experience in event, festival or media production
  • Highly organized, detail-oriented, efficient, and capable of working in a fast-paced environment
  • Very reliable, self-motivated, and proactive
  • Strong communication skills and ability to work with remote teams
  • Experience working with interactive media a plus
  • Must be able to work at G4C office in NYC
  • Currently or were recently enrolled as an undergraduate or graduate student

How to apply:
Please send an email with subject line “Festival Production Intern” to Meghan Ventura at meghan@gamesforchange.org that includes your resume as an attachment. Include the following information in the body of the email:

  • Availability (hours per week) and location
  • School, program and expected graduation year
  • Details on any prior related internship experience

 


COMMUNICATIONS INTERN

Games for Change is seeking a Communications Intern to support the NYC team on a range of communication needs including writing, blogging, social media, and research, helping promote the work of G4C’s community! This is a collaborative role that involves working closely with the G4C team.

Start date: January 16
Location: New York City or remote
Duration: Minimum 12 weeks, 20-24 hours per week

Responsibilities:

  • Pitch, write and post content to the G4C website (e.g., blogs, interviews, video and media)
  • Research and manage databases of games, organizations, programs, and developers
  • Help develop G4C social media strategy; draft content for Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube
  • Review and report on games for G4C Arcades
  • Help manage inquiries for G4C programs and consulting services
  • Compose overview documents and concept decks
  • Support G4C team across range of projects and community events, including Challenges, Festival, and Arcades

Qualifications:

  • Highly organized, detail-oriented, efficient, and capable of working in a fast-paced environment
  • Experienced in writing/blogging and social media
  • Able to prioritize and execute without sacrificing quality
  • Comfortable with WordPress, HTML, Microsoft Office, Google Docs
  • Demonstrate exemplary written and verbal communication skills
  • Experience with Adobe Suite, graphic design and/or photo editing software (preferred)
  • Passion for games for social change and interactive storytelling
  • Internship is for school credit only. Applicants must be enrolled in a college or university level program and be eligible to receive school credit

How to apply:

Please send an email with the subject line “Communication Intern” to Meghan at meghan@gamesforchange.org. Please include your resume, any writing samples, and a brief cover letter that explains:

  • Your interest and relevant experience
  • Your availability starting in January 2017 (hours per week)
  • School, program and expected graduation year

 


ADMINISTRATIVE / OPERATIONS INTERN

Games for Change seeks an administrative intern to support our NYC office.

 Start date: January 16
Location: New York City
Duration: Minimum 12 weeks, 20-24 hours per week

 Responsibilities:

  • Support G4C staff in daily activities and collaborate on special projects, as assigned
  • Help us keep our office organized, and file and scan documents
  • Assist with billing and bookkeeping
  • Conduct research on games, game-related programs, tech opportunities and interventions, and game developers

Key Qualifications:

  • Very reliable, self-motivated, and proactive
  • Passion for and interest in social impact games and video game development
  • Highly organized and detailed-oriented
  • Strong communication skills and ability to work with remote teams
  • Internship is for school credit only. Applicants must be enrolled in a college or university level program and be eligible to receive school credit

Applying:

To apply, please send an email with the subject line “Operations Intern” to Meghan Ventura at Meghan@gamesforchange.org. Please send your resume as an attachment and include the following information in the body of the email:

  • Availability (hours per week) and location
  • School, program and expected graduation year
  • Overview of interest and experience with social impact games (design, play, etc.)
  • Details on any prior related internship experience
Posted in G4C Announcement | Leave a comment

A Five-Point Collaborative Framework for Making Health & Science Games

 

THE 2016-17 INDUSTRY CIRCLE SERIES

 

We are pleased to present the second edition of the Games for Change Industry Circle, a program that acknowledges the achievements and opportunities in the impact games sector by highlighting leading studios that have made a significant contribution to our community. We hope you enjoy the following piece from Margaret Wallace, CEO of Playmatics, and that we will see you at our YouTube Live session and Q&A with Playmatics on December 15 at 12 p.m. EST. 

RSVP Here


 
industry-circle_newsletter-banner_634px

5-point framework for making health and science games
 

By Margaret Wallace, CEO, Playmatics

 
We live in an amazing time filled with enormous possibilities and many important challenges to overcome. With the emergence of revolutionary new computing platforms, like AR/VR and new technologies, we’re undergoing a major paradigm shift. There’s no better time to be innovating as far as games go and, given what’s at stake, perhaps most urgently in terms of health and science games.

Founded in 2009 by Margaret Wallace (CEO) and Nicholas Fortugno (CCO), Playmatics has roots in games as entertainment, both original and branded IP. The company has since moved into games with strong scientific, research, and health-care intervention components. Our work has been used as a mechanism to support smoking cessation, a device to aid attention training, a means to teach about pterosaurs, and a tool to advance citizen science. Knowing how to collaborate with science and health experts is critical for making games that satisfy often very specific criteria that may eventually impact thousands of lives.

What follows is a framework for collaborating with healthcare professionals and scientists for games. It’s less of a how-to manual and more about the sensibilities one must cultivate to work effectively with people from scientific disciplines outside the game industry. We use this approach with neuroscientists, behaviorists, academics, museum curators, and fellow entrepreneurs.

1. Scientists & Game Creators Part of the Same Team
Science Game Lab (SGL) is an online portal for providing researchers around the world with tools to integrate citizen science games into global leaderboards and more. Made with Dr. Benjamin Good and The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), we built APIs (application programming interfaces) based on Playmatics designs and held many subsequent discussions with scientists to assess needs. We could have never anticipated many SGL features without this dialogue.

science-game-lab_634

Science Game Lab developer tools panel | The Scripps Research Institute / Playmatics
 

When scientists, researchers, game designers, and developers operate as part of the same team, magic happens. Experts remain part of the team for the entire product lifecycle: inception, development, research, and commercialization. Without key stakeholders involved throughout, it could be nearly impossible to create fun games that satisfy clinical or research aims.

2. Respect Expertise
As much as teamwork matters, individual areas of expertise must be acknowledged and heeded. Game developers can never assume they’re experts in neuroscience, for example, and neuroscientists probably ought not see themselves as expert game designers. It’s a delicate balance as far as the final product is concerned.

Consider Pterosaurs: The Card Game a companion piece for an exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). The process for making this card game and mobile app educational, fun, and in line with this major museum exhibition entailed working with curators, subject matter experts (SMEs), and conducting design workshops with target audience members all treated as “owners” over their specific knowledge areas.

pterosaurs-playmatics_634px

Pterosaurs: The Card Game | Courtesy of the American Museum of Natural History
 

3. Determine Desired Outcomes Up Front
For health or science games, it’s useful to articulate up front your desired outcomes and how the user experience can help achieve them. Ask questions like how do you define project success? What player faculties are tested? How are player actions measured and evaluated? Determine these desired outcomes in tandem with tracking the usual key performance indicators (players, monetization, retention, attrition) from the outset.

For Pterosaurs, if we had not established desired outcomes at the beginning, game developers and SMEs might have been distracted with too many possibilities, perhaps going beyond scope or utility. Examples of initial goals mandated by The American Museum of Natural History and Playmatics included utilizing the vast materials being generated by the Museum to go along with the Pterosaurs exhibition. Another goal was to create a game with a short session length and a low barrier to entry in terms of understanding how to play. We wanted to also create a game experience that didn’t require an expert in the subject matter to be on-hand for the content to be understood.

4. Plan for Multiple Product Types & Launches
Product people are always making road maps and roll-out plans to define product strategy. Once health or science games are added into the mix, layers of complexity appear. Is the game intended for a laboratory environment? Or a major commercial release? Confusing these purposes can have a devastating impact on the quality of the game and its potential to impact lives. Your game may take a different form depending on these requirements and may have different requirements as far as regulatory, privacy, and “results” go. Best to plan for multiple product releases for the same health or science game from the outset.

5. Fun is Functional
When a game meets all clinical criteria, yet isn’t fun, we say throw it away and start over!. No game should feel burdensome. In our collaboration with Killer Snails for a board game about toxic sea creatures, the challenge involved making teaching about poison fun. We addressed this through an approachable visual style, introducing flow via a fun core mechanic and adding a humorous backstory (“assassins of the sea”). Thanks to the National Science Foundation, Playmatics continues this collaboration to take the experience to mobile.

killersnails_634px

Killer Snails digital game | Killer Snails LLC / Playmatics
 

Increasingly, games play an important role in health and science. The healthcare industry alone is a $2.8 trillion business. Using this collaborative framework enables Playmatics to work closely with researchers, scientists, and healthcare practitioners to bring our collective visions for a better world to life.

Posted in Industry Circle | 1 Comment

Games For Learning Summit Recap (part 3): The Way Forward

The Games for Learning Summit was hosted on June 23-24, 2016 at the New School’s Parsons School of Design, as part of the 13th annual Games for Change Festival. The Summit was sponsored by the Entertainment Software Association, with additional support from Microsoft. This three-part blog post summarizes the outcomes of the event through an overview of recent progress made by the learning games community (part 1), key takeaways from the Summit (part 2), and areas of opportunity for developers, educators and other stakeholders (part 3).

 

logos-esa-g4c

 

the-games-for-learning-summit-header-image

We’ve covered key takeaways from the 2016 Games for Learning Summit and the recent progress of the learning games community, so now it’s time to talk about where more work is needed. We identified three broad areas of challenge and opportunity that were frequently discussed and debated at Summit sessions, and require the collective expertise and effort of the community to help address.

  1. Numerous challenges remain for large-scale adoption of learning games in the K-12 space. One major concern was keeping up with rapidly changing technology available on the market as well as what is available in schools. David Langendoen, president of Mission US maker Electric Fun Stuff, succinctly captured this sentiment when he self-mockingly described his company’s thinking when they first started out, “We’ll build [the game] in Flash so it’s future proof!”. There are also structural limitations inherent in the school day that prevent immersive and substantive game experiences, such as length of classes, available technology, and the pressure to adhere to standards.
  1. Despite clear signs of progress for and general enthusiasm about learning games, a feeling of insecurity about the credibility of games for education permeated the Summit. This insecurity manifested itself in a few ways. First, nearly all the presentations began by describing how games align with learning theory, educational pedagogy, or human development. It is clearly useful to acknowledge these critical arguments for educational games, particularly for newcomers. However, given the high level of comprehension among the audience and the finite time designated for each presenter, the review of why games began to feel redundant and unnecessary. The second way this manifested was in the expert brainstorm held at the conclusion of the Summit. At the start of the brainstorm, experts agreed immediately that we know students can learn from games. However, when asked about the challenges ahead they also agreed that games have a credibility problem. This contradiction is interesting and will require additional work to identify who needs to know what the community has already learned, and how to educate them.
  1. More research is needed. Speakers across the conference championed the importance of formative research of many types, including user testing, efficacy testing, engagement testing, market research, and prototyping. There is a near ubiquitous agreement that including user feedback early and often is critical. Panelists also agreed that there was plenty of support for using games to provide teachers with formative feedback about their students to aid instruction and support.

However, there were still very few examples of games with demonstrated impact on learning. Impact is difficult to measure and requires a theory of change, an understanding of how students master content, and collaboration with researchers. This collaboration will be critical both for evaluation research that is embedded and aligned with game objectives, but also to make sure that research can better keep up with the advances of games and gaming technology.*

We’d love to hear if there are additional accomplishments to celebrate as we develop an agenda to build towards next year’s Summit. Please share any other milestones, moments, or accomplishment that we left out by emailing sara@gamesforchange.org.

*For more on this topic, check out the Game Impact project, which seeks to develop a typology of impact to improve stakeholder collaboration and align design with evidence and research across disciplines. This initiative brings together leaders from different domains, including academia, civics, learning, health, and game design.


View the full schedule of the 2016 Games for Learning Summit at: http://gamesforchange.org/festival/program/?type=Games+for+Learning+Summit

Videos of sessions, workshops and keynotes are available on the G4C YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/gamesforchange

Posted in Events, G4C Announcement | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Epic Orphan Nuclear Weapons Dossier: France

france_dossier

Greetings, secret agents! As a part of Mission Epic Orphan, our crowdfunding campaign that will help make nuclear risk game Epic Orphan a reality, we would like to share with you declassified information about countries that are actively working with nuclear weapons. This will give you an idea of some of the cases you will work on in Epic Orphan and that are currently facing our world today.

You can help us in the final days of this mission, too! See the redacted information that looks like this:           ?

Do some of your own legwork and tweet us a nuclear weapons fact that you found surprising about this country with the hashtag #EpicOrphan and link to the Kickstarter page for a chance to win passes to next year’s 2017 Games for Change Festival, the annual conference in New York City that celebrates games for social impact. Selected agents’ facts will appear in our updated dossier and will also be commended on our Twitter feed. The Festival passes will be raffled to one agent at the end of our Kickstarter campaign (November 20).

We look forward to your help! Stay tuned for additional dossiers. Good luck, agents!


Country: France
Leader: François Hollande
Nuclear weapons possession since: 1960
Number of weapons in nuclear arsenal: 300
Number that are operational: 290

Background: France has historically taken a very conservative approach to the disarmament of their nuclear complex. This attitude could arise from the strong association between the possession of nuclear weapons and feelings of national independence. The general public consensus in France is also pro-nuclear, especially since 75% of the country’s electricity is derived from nuclear energy.   

Additional findings on nuclear arsenal:

  • Total nuclear tests: 210
  • Most recent nuclear test: January 27, 1996
  • Number of nuclear weapons waiting to be retired: 10
  •                     
  •                              

Known nuclear incidents:

  • French policy makers have based the country’s military and energy policies around nuclear energy. However, with their next presidential election coming April of next year, the debate of whether or not the country can afford the costs of nuclear deterrence has come up as a hot topic. (more info)
  • A recent incident in 2014 at France’s Fessenheim nuclear facility seems to be more serious than previously known. Media reports claim that the government withheld information detailing the gravity of the actual incident. (more info)
  •                                                                                                                                                       
  •                                        :                                                                                                                         

 

Posted in Epic Orphan, G4C Announcement | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Epic Orphan Nuclear Weapons Dossier: Russia

russia_dossier

Greetings, secret agents! As a part of Mission Epic Orphan, our crowdfunding campaign that will help make nuclear risk game Epic Orphan a reality, we would like to share with you declassified information about countries that are actively working with nuclear weapons. This will give you an idea of some of the cases you will work on in Epic Orphan and that are currently facing our world today.

You can help us in the final days of this mission, too! See the redacted information that looks like this:           ?

Do some of your own legwork and tweet us a nuclear weapons fact that you found surprising about this country with the hashtag #EpicOrphan and link to the Kickstarter page for a chance to win passes to next year’s 2017 Games for Change Festival, the annual conference in New York City that celebrates games for social impact. Selected agents’ facts will appear in our updated dossier and will also be commended on our Twitter feed. The Festival passes will be raffled to one agent at the end of our Kickstarter campaign (November 20).

We look forward to your help! Stay tuned for additional dossiers. Good luck, agents!


Country: Russia
Leader: Vladimir Putin
Nuclear weapons possession since: 1949
Number of weapons in nuclear arsenal: 4,500
Number that are operational: 2,600

Background: Russia currently has the largest nuclear weapon stockpile in the world, being handed down the USSR’s WMD complex back in 1991. While in the past two decades Russia has done a lot to dismantle its nuclear arsenal, the country still looks to modernize some of its nuclear weapons and delivery systems to retain its status as a major military power. It is imperative that Russia remains an active member of international nuclear nonproliferation and arms control.

Additional findings on nuclear arsenal:

  • Total nuclear tests: 715
  • Most recent nuclear test: October 24, 1990
  • Number of nuclear weapons waiting to be retired: 3,200
  • Concerns over adequate storage
  •                     
  •                              

Known nuclear incidents:

  • On April 12, 1970, a K-8 USSR submarine sank in the Bay of Biscay which held four nuclear warhead torpedoes. The depth the submarine went down to made the recovery of these weapons impractical. (more info
  • Recently, Russia has stationed nuclear capable missiles in  Kaliningrad, Russia’s Baltic enclave, and increased military presence in its conflict areas. In retaliation, NATO has been doing its own military build up near Russia’s borders. (more info)
  •                                                                                                                                                       
  •                                        :                                                                                                                         
Posted in Epic Orphan | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Epic Orphan Nuclear Weapons Dossier: USA

usa_dossier

Greetings, secret agents! As a part of Mission Epic Orphan, our crowdfunding campaign that will help make nuclear risk game Epic Orphan a reality, we would like to share with you declassified information about countries that are actively working with nuclear weapons. This will give you an idea of some of the cases you will work on in Epic Orphan and that are currently facing our world today.

You can help us in the final days of this mission, too! See the redacted information that looks like this:           ?

Do some of your own legwork and tweet us a nuclear weapons fact that you found surprising about this country with the hashtag #EpicOrphan and link to the Kickstarter page for a chance to win passes to next year’s 2017 Games for Change Festival, the annual conference in New York City that celebrates games for social impact. Selected agents’ facts will appear in our updated dossier and will also be commended on our Twitter feed. The Festival passes will be raffled to one agent at the end of our Kickstarter campaign (November 20).

We look forward to your help! Stay tuned for additional dossiers. Good luck, agents!


Country: United States of America
Leader: Barack Obama
Nuclear weapons possession since: 1945
Number of weapons in nuclear arsenal: 4,571
Number that are operational: 1900

Background: The United States has a very intimate history with nuclear weapons, as it was the first to successfully develop and to use a nuclear weapon in the world. More recently, President Obama has gone great lengths to create new provisions that greatly reduce the number of active nuclear weapons in the US and Russia. Since 2010, with the enactment of this “new START” treaty, the US has stated they renounce the creation of new nuclear weapons.

Additional findings on nuclear arsenal:

  • Total nuclear tests: 1,054
  • Most recent nuclear test: September 23, 1992
  • Number of nuclear weapons waiting to be retired: 2,500
  •                     
  •                              

Known nuclear incidents:

  • By January of next year President elect, Donald Trump, will be in office. Along with his new responsibilities, Trump will also gain access to the nuclear codes for the United State’s nuclear arsenal. The question now remains of how the new leader will use this tremendous power. (more info)
  • The United States is warning North Korea of its nuclear program activities by sending a nuclear submarine to one of its planned drills in Guam. (more info)
  • In 1966, the US military accidentally dropped four atomic bombs in Spain, when a US military bomber plane crashed into a refueling plane above the country. (more info)
  • A Canadian diver recently found what seems to be the long missing Mark IV nuclear bomb that got lost when a bomber crashed near the region during the Cold War. (More info)
  • Recent territorial disputes between China and its neighbors has made the thought of military conflict in the region quite real. The US and its allies are increasing patrols, especially with China modernizing their nuclear weapons. (more info)  
  •                                                                                                                                                       
  •                                        :                                                                                                                         

 

Posted in Epic Orphan | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Epic Orphan Nuclear Weapons Dossier: North Korea

epicorphanclassifiedblog

Greetings, secret agents! As a part of Mission Epic Orphan, our crowdfunding campaign that will help make nuclear risk game Epic Orphan a reality, we would like to share with you declassified information about countries that are actively working with nuclear weapons. This will give you an idea of some of the cases you will work on in Epic Orphan and that are currently facing our world today.

You can help us in the final days of this mission, too! See the redacted information that looks like this:           ?

Do some of your own legwork and tweet us a nuclear weapons fact that you found surprising about this country with the hashtag #EpicOrphan and link to the Kickstarter page for a chance to win passes to next year’s 2017 Games for Change Festival, the annual conference in New York City that celebrates games for social impact. Selected agents’ facts will appear in our updated dossier and will also be commended on our Twitter feed. The Festival passes will be raffled to one agent at the end of our Kickstarter campaign (November 20).

We look forward to your help! Stay tuned for additional dossiers. Good luck, agents!


Country: North Korea
Leader: Kim Jong-un
Nuclear weapons possession since: 2006
Number of weapons in nuclear arsenal: 15-22
Number that are operational: ??

Background: North Korea has been suspected of developing nuclear weapons since the early 1980s. Various attempts have been made by international parties to limit their expansion and nuclear capabilities with undetermined effect.

Additional findings on nuclear arsenal:

  • Total nuclear tests: 5
  • Most recent nuclear test: September 9, 2016
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Known nuclear incidents:

  • North Korea officials report nuclear test with explosive radioactive output. China was reportedly given 20 minute advance notice of testing and question remains as to whether the testing was successfully conducted. (more info)
  • North Korea detonated underground nuclear device along with several nuclear missile tests conducted in Pyongyang. Following the test, the United Nations Security Council passed Resolution 1874 condemning the test and tightening sanctions on the country. (more info)
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