We’re Hiring: Development Intern



Games for Change (G4C) is looking for an intern to support fundraising efforts related to G4C’s work in social impact video games, esports, and immersive media. The intern will have hands-on opportunities to work on projects related to fundraising across government, corporate and foundation sectors, with an emphasis on research, data management, writing and editing. The intern will report to G4C’s Director of Development, who oversees institutional fundraising efforts for G4C.

Candidates for this unpaid internship (school credit only) should meet the below qualifications and requirements.

Position Details:

  • Support the Director of Development (and other staff as needed) in research, outreach and communication.
  • Research and compile information, including contact information, on current and potential partners and funders.
  • Assist on planning meetings and events as needed.
  • Assist in creating and editing documents, and presentations.

Key Qualifications:

  • Very reliable, self-motivated and proactive.
  • Passion for and interest in social impact games and education.
  • Highly organized and detail-oriented.
  • Strong communication skills (PowerPoint/Keynote, Google Docs) and ability to work with remote teams.
  • Strong English language skills (oral and written).
  • Demonstrate strong computer skills and ability to produce high-quality information visually.
  • Be able to work as part of a team in a constantly evolving work environment.

Requirements:

  • Weekly commitment of 20-30 hours/week; minimum of 12 weeks. Start date January 2021.
  • Position is done remotely.
  • Internship is for school credit only. Applicants must be enrolled in a college or university level program and be eligible to receive school credit.

Apply below, and please include the following in your cover letter:

  • Overview of your interest and experience with video games and/or non-profit organizations
  • Details on any prior related experience, internship or otherwise
  • Availability (hours per week)
  • Location
  • School, program, and expected graduation year


 
About Games for Change
Founded in 2004, Games for Change empowers game creators and social innovators to drive
real-world change using games that help people to learn, improve their communities, and contribute to make the world a better place. We convene stakeholders through our annual G4C Festival and foster the exchange of ideas and resources through workshops and consulting projects. We inspire youth to explore civic issues and learn 21st-century and STEM skills through our Student Challenge and train educators to run game design classes on impact games. We incubate projects through our game design challenges and executive production expertise in coalition building. We act as an amplifier by curating and evangelizing games for change to the public through our games arcades and awards.

We’re Hiring: Production Intern



Games for Change (G4C) is looking for an intern to support production efforts for the organization. The intern will support projects related to event planning and management as it relates to core G4C initiatives such as the G4C Student Challenge and XR for Change. The intern will report to G4C’s Production Manager who leads on supporting the organization in cultivating, building and nurturing strategic relationships and alliances that are essential for advancing and successfully achieving the mission of G4C.

Candidates for this unpaid internship should meet the below qualifications and requirements.

Position Details:

  • Work with G4C Production Manager to produce all aspects of live events across various G4C initiatives, including the G4C Student Challenge and XR for Change. Examples of events include game jams, arcades, panels, and awards ceremonies.
  • Tasks include scheduling, coordinating with venues, managing Eventbrite listings, researching/sourcing technology, managing database spreadsheets with contact info, and working with ad hoc facilitators as needed.
  • Assist in production of the Games for Change Festival, particularly as it relates to online submission form management, website edits, and research related to session curation.
  • Assist in creating and editing documents and presentations.

Key Qualifications:

  • Very reliable, self-motivated and proactive.
  • Passion for and interest in social impact games and education.
  • Highly organized and detail-oriented.
  • Strong communication skills (PowerPoint/Keynote, Google Docs) and ability to work with remote teams.
  • Strong English language skills (oral and written).
  • Strong ability to produce high-quality information visually.
  • Proven ability to problem-solve and multi-task in high-pressure environments.
  • Able to work as part of a team in a constantly evolving work environment.
  • Technical background and comfort with the following platforms/technologies preferred but not required: WordPress, Jotform, YouTube, HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, Google Daydream, Microsoft Surface, Apple iPad.

Requirements:

  • Weekly commitment of ~24 hours/week; minimum of 12 weeks. Start date January 2021.
  • This position will be completely remote.
  • Internship is for school credit only. Applicants must be enrolled in a college or university level program and be eligible to receive school credit.

Apply below, and please include the following in your cover letter:

  • Overview of your interest and experience with video games and/or non-profit organizations
  • Details on any prior related experience, internship or otherwise
  • Availability (hours per week).
  • Location
  • School, program, and expected graduation year


 
About Games for Change
Founded in 2004, Games for Change empowers game creators and social innovators to drive
real-world change using games that help people to learn, improve their communities, and contribute to make the world a better place. We convene stakeholders through our annual G4C Festival and foster the exchange of ideas and resources through workshops and consulting projects. We inspire youth to explore civic issues and learn 21st-century and STEM skills through our Student Challenge and train educators to run game design classes on impact games. We incubate projects through our game design challenges and executive production expertise in coalition building. We act as an amplifier by curating and evangelizing games for change to the public through our games arcades and awards.

Creating History with HistoryMaker VR

This is a guest blog post written by Dwayne Waite, Jr., Marketing Manager at Schell Games
 

Using innovative technology like virtual reality (VR) in classrooms is an exciting prospect. The fact that virtual reality can help students feel, empathize, and connect with material and concepts should give educators pause to consider how they can implement this technology in their curriculum. The true value of VR is its ability to immerse the user in another world and provide an engaging learning experience.
 
One such experience making an impact on education is HistoryMaker VR, an immersive content creation tool aimed at middle schoolers to help them learn history, while encour­aging retention and active learning. Choosing from eight diverse char­ac­ters in U.S. history including Benjamin Franklin, Harriet Tubman, and Sonia Sotomayor, learners can upload a speech, prep their stage with a variety of props and set pieces, and record them­selves in character. At the end of the recording, learners can export the video files to be shared with their teachers and class­mates. In addition, educators have access to Classroom Resources that help them easily integrate this tool into their lesson plans.
 

Using VR in the Classroom

So why should educators consider using VR in their classrooms, in general, and HistoryMaker VR, specifically? Schell Games CEO Jesse Schell spoke about designing VR games for education during the 2020 Games for Change Virtual Festival. Here are his four tips on making VR work in education, paired with how HistoryMaker VR is built and ready for the classroom.
 
Tip #1: Use the body. Virtual reality excels at taking players to a different place, being near someone or even being someone else. Unlike consoles, VR invites players to use their hands and interact with their environment.
HistoryMaker VR allows learners to embody one of eight prominent figures in U.S. history. While in character, they can set their scene, gesture, pick up books and props, and much more. The physicality of the experience provides learners with an opportunity to completely immerse themselves in the setting and character, making learning more compelling.
 
Tip #2: Use VR as a creative tool. VR is at its most powerful when players are provided the tools necessary to create something of their own.
HistoryMaker VR is built for content creation. While the tool comes with sample scripts and quotes, learners are encouraged to upload their own content and experience what it is like to “be” a historical figure. There are sets and props which allow learners to create a performance unlike any other. There is even a green screen option where they can add their own backdrop after exporting the video, providing another way for learners to express their creativity.
 
Tip #3: Design for teachers AND students. Students need to be excited and engaged with the content and technology, but teachers must view the technology as accessible and enriching.
HistoryMaker VR is built for today’s classroom with input from today’s learners and educators. Its desktop complement solves the teacher’s concern for classroom management. A simple desktop folder structure is enabled for easy use, and ‘buddy controls’ are available for the teacher to help the learner in VR if they need assistance in setting up or finishing their performance. Throughout HistoryMaker VR’s development, it was tested by educators, students, and subject matter experts to ensure the experience was fun, useful, and accurate.
 
Tip #4: VR should fulfill an educational fantasy. When completing an assignment, what does the learner wish they could do? How does the experience draw them closer to the curriculum or activity at hand?
HistoryMaker VR creates an environment where the learner can imagine being that character. They don’t have to dress up and present in a classroom, but they are presenting as that character, with props, and in front of a scene, and they get a chance to share that character’s experience.
 

HistoryMaker VR Is for Students and Teachers

HistoryMaker VR is a content creation tool, which learners can use to embody eight characters throughout U.S. history, from Founding Father Benjamin Franklin to current U.S. Supreme Court Justice, Her Honorable Sonia Sotomayor.
 

 
Students can use the sample scripts already uploaded in the tool to get familiar with all the features, or they can upload their own scripts to perform as the historical figure of their choice. Using the desktop complement, educators can manage different classrooms, groups, and assignments, along with the ability to upload prompts for the learners to address.
 

Plan, Perform, and Publish Your Work

How does a learner set up their performance? It’s simple. First, put on the VR headset (compatible with the Oculus Rift/Rift S). Then, set the stage. There are multiple scenes, props, and backdrops learners can choose.
 

 
Once the stage is set and the character is chosen, the learner and soon-to-be performer picks props for the character. For instance, if they chose to be Mark Twain, perhaps a book and bookcase might be suitable for the performance.
 

 
Then, it’s showtime! The learner can read from the teleprompter only they can see, and use their script and controls to start the performance.
 

 
Once the learner is done performing, they can watch their performance while they are still in VR. If they feel another take is necessary, it is simple to record again. Once the learner has a video that they like, they can export it to their PC and edit it, if needed, using their favorite video editing software.
 

HistoryMaker VR Is Free for Everyone

We are happy to announce that HistoryMaker VR is now available for free for everyone on the Steam store. As long as you have an Oculus Rift or Rift S, you can create history, no matter where you’re learning. To go deeper, check out the HistoryMaker VR website or watch this video.
 

Accelerating Science Through Gaming in the Time of Coronavirus

This is a guest blog post written by Saira Mortier, Research Program Coordinator at University of Washington’s Center for Game Science
 
For better or worse, COVID has pushed its way into just about every facet of life. While most of these effects have been negative, its influence on game-based science research has been a positive one. Working from home–one of COVID’s biggest impacts on the professional world–has significantly accelerated scientific discovery through gaming. We’ve also seen the critical field of antiviral research explode with new non-expert participants attempting to solve the Covid conundrum.
 
Citizen Science games have had a number of successes over the years. By combining scientific minds, video games, and everyday people, we foster an environment in which incredible learning and advancement can take place. Recently, the biggest science-related questions on everyone’s mind revolve around Covid-19. So how do we use the power of Citizen Science to address these new challenges?
 
Since February 2020, Foldit (a protein designing citizen science game) has been posting coronavirus puzzles. Our hope is that players will find ideal protein structures for an antiviral drug with the power to combat coronaviruses. This task is not unfamiliar to Foldit and its community. In 2011, players managed to solve part of the AIDS/HIV puzzle that had eluded professional scientists for over a decade.
 
Since publishing the first coronavirus puzzle in February, well over 50,000 new players have flocked to Foldit to do their part. As players all over the world share their protein designs, researchers at the University of Washington’s Institute for Protein Design evaluate, manufacture, and test player compositions for crucial binding activities. Promising designs are then further tested and are eventually moved on to clinical trials. Designing these proteins is the crucial first step toward creating a new drug.
 

[Screenshot of the Foldit Blog listing the first 99 designs they will be testing and the players who created the designs]
 
Foldit shows us how everyday people and biochemical scientists can work directly on coronavirus research. But how can we use the current circumstances to hasten progress in other scientific disciplines?
 
With the spread of coronavirus, many of us have been displaced from our offices and have to set up shop at home. Many scientists find themselves without a lab, adjusting to life as “digital citizens.” This has afforded us a unique opportunity to accelerate citizen science projects by bringing trained scientists deeper into these projects.
 

Citizens vs. Scientists “Coopetition”

When Washington State’s shelter-in-place order hit, the scientists at the Allen Institute for Brain Science were displaced from their specialized equipment and software. While this would normally have halted progress on neuronal reconstructions, Citizen Science game Mozak provided a platform for them to not only continue their work, but join forces with the Mozak community.
 
Mozak, which launched in 2016, takes images of actual neurons and presents them to players via a game platform. Players from all over the world trace the winding arbors of dendrites and axons. The resulting data are near-complete neuronal reconstructions with a high degree of accuracy. These reconstructions give scientists invaluable insights, allowing for study of the brain at a microscopic level. But now, instead of simply receiving datasets from Mozak, scientists have become a part of the active tracing community. This situation has provided a unique opportunity to connect the two disparate communities of Mozak.
 

[Screenshot of Mozak]
 
The Citizens vs. Scientists Neuron Challenge ran during the first week of April. In this “coopetition,” different labs at the Allen Institute for Brain Science competed against Mozak’s players. All players worked on the same neurons, ferociously tracing and allowing the background-run consensus algorithm to correct any mistakes. You might assume that neuroscientists—who do this work for a living— would far surpass everyday people. But citizens ended up scoring more than 57,000 points over the highest ranked lab. During the week of the challenge, the combined power of scientists and citizens resulted in an unprecedented 12 neurons reconstructed! Since the challenge’s completion, an additional 158 neurons have been completed, a three-fold increase in speed over pre-pandemic rates.
 

 
There is no doubt that this pandemic has been a tumultuous experience for humanity. There has
been so much loss, isolation, and struggle. But there are at least some positives that have come from these difficult times and those positives will have lasting effects on how we work, play, and advance.

Raising Good Gamers: New Report Tackles The Systemic Forces Shaping The Climate Of Online Play For Youth

This is a guest post written by Katie Salen Tekinbaş.
 

 
When experts from around the country came together at the World Economic Forum last February for Raising Good Gamers, a workshop focused on exploring the myriad forces shaping the culture and climate of online game communities for youth, no one could have predicted how relevant the work would become in the months that followed. As teens and tweens turned to online games in record numbers in order to connect with friends, play, and explore interests while sequestered at home with their families, many of them also experienced systemic bias, hate, harassment, and disruptive player behavior. The release of a new report, “Raising Good Gamers: Envisioning an Agenda for Diversity, Inclusion, and Fair Play,” explores why this might be the case and just what might be done about it.
 
The report synthesizes outputs, learnings, and recommendations from the workshop that brought together roughly 40 participants from commercial, research, advocacy, policy, education, and philanthropic sectors. It argues that online games, their technologies, and communities of gamers are important and potentially powerful tools for achieving broader goals of social justice. One unifying goal of RGG is to make sure that all youth—regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, or experience level—can be a gamer if they want to be. This is not a reality for many youth today. Gaming culture can be exclusionary and discriminatory, reproducing and encoding systems of bias and inequity that pervade society as a whole.
 

Playing Well, Playing Together


Taking the year 2030 as a target, the report opens with a set of visions for the future of online play, crafted by workshop participants “What kinds of experiences,” we asked, “are young gamers (8-13 years old) having in video games and online communities in the year 2030?” Examples include:

Young gamers are having fun, learning from each other, and learning to be good citizens of gaming and online communities. They are able to transfer some of their skills and citizenship sensibility to other aspects of their lives.

They are connecting and mentoring each other in online gaming spaces that are safe, mixed age, and centered on creation, exploration, inquiry, and friendly competition.

Youth and their parents have a deeper understanding of digital citizenship, supported and taught in a robust way by their schools. They are finding reduced anonymity across all online spaces which brings new challenges and opportunities for how they navigate and craft their digital personas.

The collective visions, while varied, had much in common.

  • Prosocial game behavior would be celebrated and incentivized, participation diversified, and minoritized voices elevated.
  • Youth would not only be supported by schools, parents, and peers to develop necessary skills to survive and thrive online, but would also take on active roles as mentors, moderators, and role models.
  • Online communities would be inclusive and provide a diversity of ways to belong and participate.
  • Experiences would be tailored to be age/developmentally appropriate, intentionally moderated to build positive communities, and scaffolded to teach social and emotional learning in the process.
  • Any approach would necessarily need to engage youth as key agents of change in defining, shaping, and sustaining the culture and climate of more safe, inclusive, and supportive online game communities.

 

Systemic Effects


Online aggression, hate, harassment, prejudice, and disruptive player behavior—what the report refers to as online toxicity—has its root causes not in individual players or games, but in a system of interconnections, interactions, policies, patterns, and power dynamics. This system involves many stakeholders with different values and priorities who influence the system in various, interrelated ways. The report highlights potential relationships between stakeholders and other dynamics contributing to a complex culture of toxicity in online gaming, including the following:

Streamers behave badly as a way to increase their views and likes, which in turn maximizes their profits and those of their company sponsors.

Game companies cannot fully control who plays their games, despite Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) ratings.

Younger players play mature games and learn through their interactions with older and often toxic audiences.

Cultural stigmatization of gaming leads to a lack of educator involvement in supporting prosocial and educational gaming spaces in schools.

Lack of public access to data from game companies on the nature of harm on any game platform limits research and policy that could improve safety and trust.

Online human moderation at scale is expensive and it is difficult to get buy-in from leadership to invest in it.

Systemic bias in the design of technologies and representations work against diversity,reinforce player stereotypes, and ultimately limit the definition of who is a gamer.

The report represents a first step in RGG’s efforts to help identify areas of opportunity to be taken up by developers, researchers, practitioners, young people and others to bring about the desired change in the culture and climate of online play for young players. In addition to identifying six areas of opportunity, the report also puts forth an initial research agenda that can inform and guide the initiative. My RGG co-organizers—Susanna Pollack, Diana J. Moreau, and Arana Shapiro—have assembled a star-powered advisory board that includes 30-plus members from organizations like Roblox, Mojang, Fair Play Alliance, AnyKey, PBS Kids, Nickelodeon, Ubisoft, Dreamyard, Facebook Gaming, Riot, Google Stadia, Anti-Defamation League, AbleGamers, ISTE, TED-Ed, Hispanic Heritage Foundation, Maven Youth, Supercell, Entertainment Software Association, and others. The advisory board includes teen ambassadors whose voices will be at the center of the initiative. We are excited by the breadth and depth of expertise represented and are eager to identify additional supporters to help turn the agenda outlined in the report into a reality.
 
Learn more about the Raising Good Gamers initiative.

.

Get Ready to #STEMYourGame!


 

 
Games for Change and Endless are thrilled to present a new design challenge for professional game creators: the STEM Your Game Challenge! With the onset of COVID-19, and transition to remote and hybrid learning models, the educational landscape is rapidly changing. Educators and parents are recognizing a need to find digital tools to reach young people and keep them both motivated and engaged. In response to this growing need – and to help youth become inquisitive and informed citizens in this complex, technology-driven world, we are challenging game developers to help make STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) learning fun!
 
The STEM Your Game Challenge invites professional game creators to submit existing (or beta-level) ‘entertainment-first’ games and a proposal for how the game could be redeveloped for STEM learning purposes. Through a rigorous evaluation process, 1-3 finalist(s) will be selected to receive up to $150,000 in funding and participate in a 5-month development period, during which they will retool their existing game in consultation w/ a team of cross-sector learning experts. At the conclusion of the development period, finalist(s) will publish their STEM game and have the opportunity to take advantage of marketing opportunities, including participating in the STEM Your Game Arcade showcase at the 2021 Games for Change Festival (Summer 2021).
 
The competition is open to all game developers and is limited to digital games ONLY (no VR submissions please). Registration opens today and the submission form will remain open through January 6, 2021.

 
Submit here: bit.ly/STEMYourGame
Deadline: Jan, 6 2021

 
For further details on the Challenge, please reference the STEM Your Game Challenge Guidelines and Official Rules. Get ready to #STEMYourGame!
 

We’re Hiring: Executive Assistant



Games for Change seeks an Executive Assistant to provide comprehensive support to the President and the Board of Directors. This dynamic position requires the ability to anticipate needs, think critically, and offer solutions to problems with a high level of professionalism and confidentiality.

This is a full time position (Monday-Friday, 10AM-6PM) that will start remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic. As the public health situation improves, this position will be based out of the G4C office in New York City

Responsibilities:

  • Provide sophisticated calendar management for the President of Games for Change. Prioritize inquiries and requests while troubleshooting conflicts; make judgements and recommendations to ensure smooth day-to-day engagements.
  • Act as a liaison and provide support to the Board of Directors. Arrange and handle all logistics for Board meetings and events: schedule meetings; draft agendas; develop, compile, and distribute presentation materials; and record meeting minutes on behalf of Board Secretary. Adhere to compliance with applicable rules and regulations set in bylaws regarding Board matters.
  • Complete a broad variety of administrative tasks that facilitate the President’s ability to effectively lead the organization, including: assisting with special projects; designing and producing complex documents, reports, and presentations; collecting and preparing information for meetings with staff and outside parties; composing and preparing correspondence; maintaining contact lists; making travel arrangements; and completing expense and mileage reports.
  • Serve as the primary point of contact for internal and external constituencies on all matters pertaining to the President, including those of a highly confidential or critical nature. Prioritize and determine appropriate course of action, referral, or response, exercising judgement to reflect the President’s style and organization policy.
  • Work closely with the President to keep them well informed of upcoming commitments and responsibilities, following up appropriately. Act as a “barometer,” having a sense for the issues taking place in the environment and keeping the President updated. Anticipate the President’s needs in advance of meetings, conferences, etc.
  • Assist with staff meetings and events as needed.
  • Manage and coordinate the President’s outreach activities which includes setting up and executing mail merges and following up on contacts made by the President to cultivate ongoing relationships.
  • Support fundraising efforts through proposal writing, event planning and research.
  • Provide event management support as requested.
  • Provide hospitality to all guests and help to create a welcoming environment.
  • Answer the main phone line and respond to inquiries.
  • Invest in building long-lasting relationships both externally and internally.
  • Other projects/duties as assigned for the overall benefit of the organization including limited office management duties.


Key Qualifications:

  • Strong ability to execute work with a diversity, equity, and inclusion lens.
  • Significant executive support experience, including supporting C-level executives. Nonprofit board experience is highly-preferred.
  • Expert proficiency with Microsoft Office, Google Suite, Salesforce and other cloud based platforms; ability to design and edit graphic presentations and materials.
  • Strong verbal and written communication skills.
  • Exceptional organizational skills and impeccable attention to detail.
  • High degree of professionalism in dealing with diverse groups of people, including Board members, senior executives, staff, community leaders, donors, and funded partners.
  • Make appropriate, informed decisions regarding priorities and available time.
  • Ability to complete a high volume of tasks and projects with little or no guidance.
  • Ability to react with appropriate levels of urgency to situations and events that require quick response or turnaround.
  • Able to maintain a high level of integrity and discretion in handling confidential information.
  • Excellent judgment is essential.
  • Ability to switch gears at a moment’s notice.


How to apply:


To apply, please send an email with the subject line “G4C Executive” to Marissa Harts at [email protected] Please send your resume as an attachment and include your cover letter (which should share what makes you a fit for this role, plus your favorite game to play) in the body of the email.

We’re Hiring: Program and Communications- Education Intern



Games for Change (G4C) is looking for Programs and Communications Intern to support a range of projects promoting games for social impact this Fall for G4C and the National Student Challenge.

Candidates for this unpaid internship should meet the below qualifications and requirements.

Position Details:

  • Support G4C staff in daily activities and collaborate on special projects, as assigned
  • Conduct research on games, game related programs, articles, tech opportunities and interventions, and game developers
  • Assist with In Kind donation outreach and organization for the National Student Challenge and other programs
  • Assist with managing local partnerships and events to promote the NYC Student Challenge program and other learning programs
  • Research new outreach platforms for students and teachers
  • Work directly with G4C’s Communications Manager to assist with building a student facing community and social media channels & content.
  • Help with other tasks as needed.

Key Qualifications:

  • Very reliable, self-motivated and proactive
  • Passion for and interest in social impact games and video game development
  • Highly organized and detailed-oriented
  • Strong communication skills and ability to work with remote teams
  • Desire to share Games for Change’s mission


Requirements:

  • Weekly commitment of approximately 15-20 hours/week
  • Start date September 2020.
  • Position will be completed remotely.
  • Internship is for school credit only. Applicants must be enrolled in a college or university level program and be eligible to receive school credit


To Apply:
To apply, please send an email with the subject line “Programs Communications Intern” to Marissa Harts, Programs & Operations Manager ([email protected]). Please send your resume as an attachment and include the following information in the body of the email:

  • Availability (hours per week) and location
  • School, program and expected graduation year
  • Overview of interest and experience with social impact games (design, play, etc.)
  • Details on any prior related internship experience


About Games for Change
Founded in 2004, Games for Change empowers game creators and social innovators to drive real-world change using games that help people to learn, improve their communities, and contribute to make the world a better place. We convene stakeholders through our annual G4C Festival and foster the exchange of ideas and resources through workshops and consulting projects. We inspire youth to explore civic issues and learn 21st-century and STEM skills through our Student Challenge and train educators to run game design classes on impact games. We act as an amplifier by curating and evangelizing games for change to the public through our games arcades and awards.

Investing in the Future of Digital Play

This is a guest blog post written by LEGO Ventures.
 

 
Play is an important element of learning and development. When children engage in playful experiences, it can help them acquire important 21st Century Skills such as creativity, collaboration, and critical thinking. The LEGO Foundation describes ‘learning through play’ as occurring when an experience is joyful, meaningful, engaging, iterative, and interactive. These elements can all be found in digital games, and thanks to the rapid evolution of technology, there are more ways to play and exercise cognitive muscles than ever before.
 
Digital games and experiences offer a new way to play in entirely new environments, while developing a variety of skills that can be difficult to teach in traditional classroom settings. Digital play provides endless solutions by using entirely virtual worlds where users can use imagination and creativity to solve problems. This is why we at LEGO Ventures are passionate about supporting innovations in digital play – we believe it has the ability to unlock potential, and that learnings from playing games can also positively affect real-world skills such as critical thinking and creativity. In other words, the skills developed while playing digital games can be directly transferred to the real world, demonstrating that gaming has the ability to foster important life skills.
 
LEGO Ventures invests in startups and entrepreneurs who are creating the future of ‘learning through play’. Within our investment thesis, we look at new games and gaming studios that facilitate skill development through unique methods. An example of a gaming company we’ve supported is Klang, a Berlin-based studio which seeks to explore the future of humanity through virtual simulations. Klang’s initial game, SEED, has the narrative of humans inhabiting a new planet and attempting to build a new society. The game allows players to manage ‘Seedlings’ driven by AI, while collaborating with one another to build fully-functional societies to ensure their survival. Klang offers players with unique challenges that can be tackled with teamwork, creativity, and agility – key skills that are just as necessary in the game as they are in the real world.
 
In addition to LEGO Ventures’ investments, we have recently launched an in-house Incubation Studio, which investigates trends in playful learning, tests ideas, and validates new businesses concepts. The LEGO Ventures Incubation Studio works with entrepreneurs passionate about the LEGO Idea of learning through play, but who are only at the ideation stage of their startup journey.
 
If you are developing an innovative game that supports learning, creativity, and play, we’d love to hear from you! You can apply for venture funding or to be part of our Incubation Studio on our website at www.legoventures.com, or follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn to hear more about what we’re up to.
 

We’re Hiring: Fall Communications Intern



Games for Change (G4C) is looking for a communications intern to support a range of projects promoting games for social impact this Fall. Candidates for this unpaid internship should meet the qualifications and requirements below.

Candidates for this unpaid internship should meet the below qualifications and requirements.

Position Details:

  • Support G4C Staff (Communications Manager) in outreach and communication activities across range of game development projects
  • Conduct research on games, game related programs, articles, tech opportunities and interventions, and game developers
  • Communicate / Outreach to partners seeking support with impact game projects and lease with game developers, funders, researchers, and evaluators
  • Compile contact lists and research contact info
  • Compose copy for social media posts, overview documents, and concept decks
  • Aid in creating graphics and collateral for social media posts, events and more

Key Qualifications:

  • Very reliable, self-motivated and proactive
  • Passion for and interest in social impact games and video game development (production, design, & development)
  • Highly organized and detailed-oriented
  • Strong copywriting and editing skills
  • Proficiency in Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, InDesign, After Effects and Premiere Pro a plus!)
  • Experience with WordPress and Mailchimp a plus
  • Strong communication skills and ability to work with remote teams
  • Desire to share Games for Change’s mission


Requirements:

  • Weekly commitment of 20-30 hours/week, plus participation at G4C events; minimum of 12 weeks. Start date September 2020.
  • Position will be completed remotely.
  • Internship is for school credit only. Applicants must be enrolled in a college or university level program and be eligible to receive school credit


To Apply:
To apply, please send an email with the subject line “Communications Intern” to Marissa Harts, Programs & Operations Manager ([email protected]). Please send your resume as an attachment and include the following information in the body of the email:

  • Availability (hours per week)
  • School, program and expected graduation year
  • Overview of interest and experience with social impact games (design, play, etc.)
  • Details on any prior related internship experience


About Games for Change
Founded in 2004, Games for Change empowers game creators and social innovators to drive real-world change using games that help people to learn, improve their communities, and contribute to make the world a better place. We convene stakeholders through our annual G4C Festival and foster the exchange of ideas and resources through workshops and consulting projects. We inspire youth to explore civic issues and learn 21st-century and STEM skills through our Student Challenge and train educators to run game design classes on impact games. We act as an amplifier by curating and evangelizing games for change to the public through our games arcades and awards.